Barbados

Barbados

Things to do - general

Barbados is the easternmost island in the Lesser Antilles. It is flat in comparison to its island neighbours to the west, the Windward Islands. The island rises gently to the central highland region, with the highpoint of the nation being Mount Hillaby, in the geological Scotland District, 340 metres (1,120 ft) above sea level. The island is situated in the Atlantic Ocean, east of the other West Indies Islands.

In the parish of Saint Michael lies Barbados’ capital and main city, Bridgetown. Other major towns scattered across the island include Holetown, in the parish of Saint James; Oistins, in the parish of Christ Church; and Speightstown, in the parish of Saint Peter.

Flag
Country Barbados
Visa requirementsNo Visa Required
Languages spokenEnglish
Currency usedBarbadian Dollars (BBD) $1 USD - $2 BBD
Area (km2)439 km² 166 sq mi

Things to do

Animal Flower Cave

40300894_3a1fc29a6e_oPhoto by Sharon Terry /Creative Commons

Located to the North of the Island in the parish of St.Lucy is The Animal Flower Cave. Named "Animal Flower Cave" because of the sea anemones that can be found in the pools around the cave. Some of these pools are deep enough for you to swim in. The Cave opens up in Several locations, allowing spectacular views of the ocean.The Cave walls are filled with formations that are colored different shades of green and brown. Animal Flower cave is an amazing Activity in Barbados.

 

 

Harrison's Cave

Harrisons CavePhoto by Loozrboy / Creative Commons

At the heart of Barbados lies one of its greatest wonders, Harrison’s Cave. Located in the central uplands of the island, this breathtakingly beautiful, crystallized limestone cavern is a testament to nature’s mastery. Flowing streams, deep pools of crystal clear water and towering columns characterize this living cave. Gaze in wonder at the white flow stones and in awe at the beauty of the speleothems which adorn the cave. Be sure to make Harrison’s Cave your first stop while in Barbados and Unearth the Adventure! www.harrisonscave.com

Bottom Bay

Bottom BayPhoto by Brook Ward / Creative Commons

The beach is semi enclosed by high coral cliffs, providing a panoramic view of the south shore. The scene is completed by the presence of tall palm trees that add to the peaceful and relaxing atmosphere of the bay. Always a popular picnic spot, it is also becoming a popular place to live and a number of homes are being built on the tops of the cliffs overlooking the beach and ocean. People who live there report spotting turtles and whales in the waters below the rocks. Bathing here is not recommended, as the waves are very strong, and great care should be shown by those who choose to do so.

Andromeda Botanical Gardens

Andromeda botanical gardensPhoto by Jack Says Relax / CC License

The Andromeda Botanical Gardens, found in the parish of St.Joseph, is a six-acre garden containing several varieties of orchids, palms, ferns, heliconia, hibiscus, bougainvillea, begonias and cacti. The beautiful and exotic flowers and trees are complemented by a lovely stream which bisects the land and forms enchanting pools and waterfalls.

Miami Beach

Miami Beach BarbadosPhoto by Jow Ross / CC License

Miami Beach, Barbados, near the town of Oistins, is a popular sandy beach . It is located on the south coast of the island, with usually calm waters and brilliant sunset views. On its north side is Enterprise Beach, a much more sheltered bay popular with families. Miami Beach is popular with both locals and tourists.

Culture and history info

History

Amerindian settlement of Barbados dates to about the 4th to 7th centuries AD, by a group known as the Saladoid-Barrancoid. In the 13th century, the Kalinago arrived from South America. The Spanish and Portuguese briefly claimed Barbados from the late 16th to the 17th centuries. The Arawaks are believed to have fled to neighbouring islands. Apart from possibly displacing the Caribs, the Spanish and Portuguese made little impact and left the island uninhabited. Some Arawaks migrated from British Guiana (modern-day Guyana) in the 1800s and continue to live in Barbados.

From the arrival of the first English settlers in 1627-1628 until independence in 1966, Barbados was under uninterrupted English and later British governance and was the only Caribbean island that did not change hands during the colonial period. In the very early years, the majority of the population was white and male, with African slaves providing little of the workforce. Cultivation of tobacco, cotton, ginger and indigo was handled primarily by European indentured labour until the start of the sugar cane industry in the 1640s. As Barbados' economy grew, Barbados developed a large measure of local autonomy through its founding as a proprietary colony. Its House of Assembly began meeting in 1639. Among the island's earliest leading figures was the Anglo-Dutch Sir William Courten.

The 1780 hurricane killed over 4,000 people on Barbados. In 1854 a cholera epidemic killed over 20,000 inhabitants. At emancipation in 1833, the size of the slave population was approximately 83,000. Between 1946 and 1980, Barbados' rate of population growth was diminished by one-third because of emigration to Britain.

Culture

The influence of the English on Barbados is more noticeable than on other islands in the West Indies. A good example of this is the island's national sport: cricket. Barbados has brought forth several great cricketers, including Sir Garfield Sobers and Sir Frank Worrell. Citizens are officially called Barbadians. The term "Bajan" (pronounced BAY-jun) may have come from a localised pronunciation of the word Barbadian, which at times can sound more like "Bar-bajan".

The largest carnival-like cultural event that takes place on the island is the Crop Over festival. As in many other Caribbean and Latin American countries, Crop Over is an important event for many people on the island, as well as the thousands of tourists that flock to there to participate in the annual events. The festival includes musical competitions and other traditional activities, and features the majority of the island's homegrown calypso and soca music for the year. The male and female Barbadians who harvested the most sugarcane are crowned as the King and Queen of the crop. Crop Over gets under way at the beginning of July and ends with the costumed parade on Kadooment Day, held on the first Monday of August.

In music, eight-time Grammy Award winner Rihanna (born in Saint Michael) is one of Barbados' best-known artists. In 2009 she was appointed as an Honorary Ambassador of youth and culture for Barbados by the late Prime Minister, David Thompson.

Singer-songwriter Shontelle, the band Cover Drive, and musician Rupee also originate from Barbados. Grandmaster Flash (born Joseph Saddler in Bridgetown in 1958) is a hugely influential musician of Barbadian origin, pioneering hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing in 1970s New York. The Merrymen are a well known Calypso band based in Barbados, performing from the 1960s into the 2010s.Culture and history image

Vistamar Villas

Vistamar Villas

Lot 13 Prospect Road, Prospect, St.James, Barbados
Price per night from $ 200
Vistamar Villas are family-run short-term holiday apartments located along the Platinum Coast of Bar More info

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